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today the senate will vote on the house-passed legislation to suspend the debt ceiling until the summer and remove the specter of default hanging over the nation's economy. i suspect this will pass sending the message long and clear that while we're willing to negotiate on many things, we will not engay inch in another -- engage in another irresponsible debate over whether the united states government should pay its bills. most of my republican colleagues voted for the spending. what are some of those bills we've incurred? mr. president, we've had two wars going on that have been unpaid for with real money. we borrowed the money p. every republican voted for these wars. so we should pay our bills. i was reassured by house republicans' decision last week to back off their reckless threat to hold the debt ceiling hostage. dosuspending the debt limit will ensure we pay the bills we've already incurred. the legislation before the senate sets an important precedent that the full fanal and credit of the -- the full faith and credit of the united states will no longer be used as a pawn to extr
. the underlying bill that we're going to vote on in a little while suspends the debt ceiling for a period of time, as we all know. my amendment doesn't change that fact, but it addresses one of the consequences of that fact. the fact is, this bill suspends the debt ceiling, but it doesn't resolve the underlying problem. and so we're going to be back here in a few months with the same impasse that we've had in the past. what do we do about the mounting debt? what do we do about having reached the debt ceiling? and will twe we do anything abot curving the spending that is -- mr. baucus: madam president, the senate is not in order. the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. mr. toomey: so -- thank you, madam president. so, the fact is, we're going to be -- mr. baucus: madam president, madam president, the senate is not in order. the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. the senators shall take their conversations out of chamber. mr. toomey: thank you, madam president. so my point is that we're going to be back at this situation where we will have reached the debt limit once again.
forward on that. we need to raise the debt ceiling and stop playing politics with this, but let the house of representatives get moving on the issues that affect everyday americans. that's all about jobs, that's all about this economic recovery. madam president, i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: yes, the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i ask unanimous consent to dispense with the quorum. the presiding officer: without objection. for the senate, the letter of resignation of senator john f. kerry of massachusetts, effective friday, february 1, at 4:00 p.m. without objection, the letter is deemed read and spread upon the journal. mr. brown: madam president, i ask unanimous consent the judiciary committee be discharged from further consideration of s. res. 14 and the senate proceed to its consideration. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. res. 14, raising awareness and encouraging prevention of stalking by designating january, 2013, as national stalking a
that had already been approved in the house that extended the debt ceiling until late this summer. it was the right thing to do. it was the right thing to extend the debt ceiling of our nation because it allows us to pay the bills that we have already incurred. there isn't one dime of new spending that's authorized under the legislation we approved. my only regret is that we didn't extend it for a longer period of time, giving greater certainty to the financial markets. for you see that if we were to ever violate the debt ceiling, the consequences would be that the taxpayers of this country would have to pay more for the obligations of our nation and interest costs. it would permanently damage the reputation of this nation as far as our ability to pay our bills. it would be counterproductive to everything we're trying to do to help the taxpayers of america. so it was the right thing for us to do to extend the debt ceiling, but we still have a lot more work we need to do. our current accumulation of debt is not sustainable. we can't continue to spend what we're spending today and c
and whether or not to raise the debt ceiling. so here's the key actor. >> host: is he a strong leader? >> guest: i think it was much more powerful figure by the force of his personality, gingrich was a more creative thinker. boehner on the other hand understands strengths and limitations. he's a likable person. it's appropriately cautious and they think is actually that the republican party through some difficult times here in the last couple months and when i most encouraged about this the way he navigated republicans away from what would've been a disastrous debate what the president overgrazing at the ceiling. if republicans had time to this issue and said, you know, were not going to raise the debt ceiling unless at a certain amount of cuts, they would've caved in the end, would've been disastrous, much like what the fiscal cliff and i think boehner and right together did a very nice job convincing republicans that you can't govern from the house, but sure to be careful about getting into these high-profile, high-stakes, last-minute negotiations with the president. it worked in th
, in washington over the past few months, our attention has been a cliff, ma on debt ceiling, budgets, deadlines, negotiations. all of this is extremely important because i don't think there's any substitute for getting our fiscal house in order. there's no greater moral imperative than to reduce the mountain of debt that is facing us, our children, and theirs. and are house republican majority stands ready for the president and his party to join us in tackling the big problems facing this country. but today, i'd like to focus really on what lies beyond fiscal debate. and over the next two years, our house majority will pursue an agenda that is based on a shared vision of creating the conditions of health, happiness, and prosperity for more americans and their family. and to restrain washington from interfering in those pursuits. we will advance proposals aimed at producing results in areas like education, health care, innovation, and job growth. our solutions will be based on the conservative principles of self-reliance, faith in the individual, trusting family, and accountability in government
the debt ceiling? >> well, a decision by house republican leaders at their retreat about two weeks ago. they tried in 2011 to use the debt limit as a leverage point of force obama to swallow big spending cuts. it worked, but it was terribly damaging, but the the nation's economy and to their political capital. congressional plummeted to something like 9 percent. and they recognize that this was a bad idea. gambling with the faith and credit of the united states it turns out as a pretty bad idea. we were downgraded for the first time in the nation's history. they did not want to do that again. like us said, they did not want to vote for a bigger national debt either. that does not fit with their philosophy, so they came up with this strategy of saying, okay, we will suspend it. in the meantime, we really want the senate to pass a budget for 2014, and the law also says that if either chamber fails to adopt the budget by april 15th, their paychecks will be docked. so the whole idea of this thing is to a postpone this sort of economy prattling default situation until they can prosecute thi
the debt ceiling will finally move our friends on the other side beyond their preoccupation with the horse race. already, senate democrats have committed to developing a budget this year after years of ducking their responsibilities to do so. hopefully this will be a serious exercise and not simply an excuse for them to try to raise taxes, which as we all know is just another way to avoid solving core problems. last week i came to the floor with a chart that showed that even if the president got every single tax increase he asked for, every one of them, we would still not evening come close to solving the problem. not even close. so let's not waste time with more pointless argument argument tax increases. we had that debate already. it's done, it's oamplet i call on democrats to approach it seriously and do it with order. we have to break this putting off all important work until the final hour. tweendz get back to regular order and that takes time. & that's why we need to get started right now. let the tough work of developing a budget and putting together a long-term policy to control go
with the kind of spending reforms necessary to secure a longer extension of the debt ceiling. that extra time will give us a chance to break the democrats' other bad habit of leaving everything, literally everything until the last minute. but we can only do it if we get to work now and return to what we call around here the regular order. remember, regular order is how the senate is supposed to function. committees are supposed to be allowed to evaluate legislation. amendments are supposed to be considered, and the public is supposed to have a chance to scrutinize the proposals that are actually before us. look, i know that solving the debt challenge is not going to be easy. putting our country on a sustainable fiscal and economic path is going to require both parties committing to serious spending reforms. but this is a challenge we must overcome. by doing the hard work today, we can avoid a european-style catastrophe tomorrow. by reforming the functions of government that no longer make sense in 2013, we can do more than just control spending. we can encourage private sector growth and job
clip after another after another. either the debt ceiling or the sequestered or the sgr click. as congressional staffers, as i'm sure debbie can attest to, we are constantly living in this temporary environment because we have to. that is unfortunate the reality of the place. would all like to take some time and do a deep dive into deep policy thing and try to think of transformational ideas that can transmit everything, but when the kind of walked into work of reality kind of hits us. we have a job to do. we have to take care of the things that is most pressing on the front end and, unfortunately, that's kind of the environment we're living in. and it was a very interesting panel, especially the last one, where i was kind of hearing, and there's nothing better than congressional staffers who actually hear from people who actually practice medicine. actually talk to patients who are going through this. and one of the things that, you know, the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately, and this is something we all have to deal with, is just a fiscal reality. as you rightly po
that was brought by house republicans in passing their no budget, no pay provision as part of the debt ceiling bill that's now come over to the senate, it looks like the senate according to senator murray will now take up a budget. this is important because while republicans believe that spending is the problem not a lack of taxation, it's going to be a revealing exercise to see how this budget markup goes in committee and then, of course, on the floor. and it will be, i'm sure, a challenge for those who believe that more revenue is a solution as opposed to reining in spending to see how senate democrats produce 51 votes to pass a budget by the april 15th deadline. >> senate republicans just released a video that highlights the president's past statements when it comes to tackling the debt and his actual record when it comes to tackling the debt. and when out comes to reducing the debt as we would say out in the west, the president has been all hat and no cowboy. in other words, he's been all talk and no action. what we've seen over the past four years as trillion dollar deficits every single year,
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11